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Information for Visitors

Visiting Hours

Visiting hours at Starship Children's Hospital are from 8.00am to 8.00pm unless other arrangements are made with the charge nurse. Most wards have a rest period from 1.00pm to 3.00pm, and we would ask that you avoid visiting during this time (unless you are the parents or caregivers of a child or young person in hospital).

For visiting NICU, see the parent information factsheets on the Newborn Services website.

Please respect the privacy of others and only visit the child you have come to see. If you are not visiting a child, you require an appointment with the department you wish to visit.

See 'directions and parking' for information on how to get to the hospital and where to park. 'Whats at Starship' will tell you which level of the hospital wards are located on.

If you need directions in and around Starship Children's Hospital or Greenlane Clinical Centre, ask one of our blue coat ambassadors - our friendly volunteers who are there to help you find your way around. There are information desks at key locations on both sites. And remember - the Auckland District Health Board has a smokefree policy that means smoking is not permitted anywhere within the hospital grounds.

Sending a letter or a gift to a child in hospital

Please address it to:

Child's Name (patient)
Ward number
Starship Children's Health
Park Road
Auckland 1023

or alternatively

Private Bag 92024
New Zealand 

If you do not know what ward the child is on, please phone (64 9) 307 4949 to find out.

Infection prevention and control

Sick PuppyIf family members/visitors are unwell with a cold, 'flu or 'flu-like symptoms, or a "tummy bug", or have been in contact with anyone with an infectious disease such as measles, mumps, rubella or chickenpox in the last two to three weeks, please do not visit Starship. If you are unsure, check with the enquiries desk in the ward before you visit anyone.

Play your part to help reduce infections by knowing how and when to wash your hands. Washing your hands is the best way to prevent the spread of germs. Anyone can develop an infection but patients are at increased risk. Their immune system may be weak, they may have had/or are going to have a procedure or require a long stay in hospital. Read more information here 

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